Obscure Historical Reference of the Day

During dinner at Chez Platt Stephen was discussing the merits of setting up shop in Turin or Milan. One interesting fact mentioned about the home Fiat and Juventus was the Shroud of Turin. From Wikipedia, the source of all truth in the world:

The Shroud of Turin (or Turin Shroud) is a linen cloth bearing the image of a man who appears to have been physically traumatized in a manner consistent with crucifixion. It is kept in the royal chapel of the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Turin, Italy. It is believed by many to be the cloth placed on Jesus of Nazareth at the time of his burial.

The image on the shroud is much clearer in black-and-white negative than in its natural sepia color. The striking negative image was first observed on the evening of May 28, 1898 on the reverse photographic plate of amateur photographer Secondo Pia who was allowed to photograph it while it was being exhibited in the Turin Cathedral. According to Pia, he almost dropped and broke the photographic plate from the shock of seeing an image of a person on it.

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One Response to Obscure Historical Reference of the Day

  1. antik says:

    But hasn’t science debunked that as yet another con-job perpetrated by the Church of Rome on the hopelessly gullible.. ?? ..

    Further from Wikipedia.. “Radiocarbon dating in 1988 by three independent teams of scientists yielded results published in Nature indicating that the shroud was made during the Middle Ages, approximately 1300 years after Jesus lived. Claims of bias and error in the testing were raised almost immediately, and were answered by Harry E. Gove or others.”

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